New research line on µRTS

This new research line was started one year ago together with PhD student Abdessamed Ouessai and professor Mohammed Salem both from the University of Mascara (Algeria).

The objective is focused on the improvemet of the decision process of an autonomous agent for playing a simple Real-Time Strategy Game, named µRTS (microRTS). See an illustrative image below of this game/simulator created by Proffessor Santiago Ontañón mainly for research purposes.

For the moment three papers have been published:

  1. Online Adversarial Planning in μRTS: A Survey. Presented at 2019 International Conference on Theoretical and Applicative Aspects of Computer Science (ICTAACS) on December 2019, and selected as Best paper of the conference.
  2. Improving the Performance of MCTS-Based µRTS Agents Through Move Pruning. Published and presented at IEEE Conference on Games 2020 last August 2020.
  3. Parametric Action Pre-Selection for MCTS in Real-Time Strategy Games. Presented at CoSECiVi 2020 yesterday.

Here you can see the slides and the video presentation of the paper at CoG:

Moreover an agent named USMBot was created and participed in the last µRTS AI Competition, reaching rank 4!!!

The bot can be found in Github

We hope you like it, as usual. :D

Finding an evolutionary solution to the game of Mastermind with good scaling behavior

As important as finding a solution to the game of MasterMind that is better than anyone else is to find one that can be applied to a wide range of sizes. In this paper we get rid of a parameter, the limit size of the consistent set we use for scoring every combination. This makes a faster algorithm, and not always worse than the optimal consistent set size.

This was the paper presented at LION by Antonio Fernández using this presentation

Doing evolutionary algorithms with Dropbox

Why not use Dropbox as its name implies, as a box for dropping individuals that could be interchanged among different islands running evolutionary algorithms?
That’s exactly what we are doing in a series of papers that are being published and presented in IWDECIE, CEC 2011 and GECCO, in last-in, first-out order. This presentation is for the second, presented today in CEC.

What we try to test in this paper is whether we can add a good number of computers (up to 4) without a saturation of the network (or of Dropbox itself), and whether there is a difference between wired and wireless. It so happens there is, but it gets smaller when you increase the number of computers.
IMG_0189
Still many tests to to, but for the time being this looks promising. We’ll link the paper when it’s available. For the time being, if you’re interested just send us an email