Out of CPU cycles and in need to do science? No problem!

After the bad experience of spending money in clusters and grids and then spending more time doing maintenance, hack-proofing and installing stuff than science, maybe it is the time to rethink how massive distributed evolutionary computation should be done. Nowadays there are lots of free or use-based resources that can be tapped for doing volunteer-based evolutionary algorithms. That is way my last keynote and tutorial have dealt with that: the IDC Keynote, Low or No Cost Evolutionary computation, which you can access here in Heroku, puts the money where its mouth is: talking and doing volunteer-based evolutionary computing at the same time. The PPSN tutorial, Low or no cost distributed evolutionary computation, touched on the same topic, only longer and with more enphasis on tools.
So finally it is just a matter of a little Javascript and using free cloud resources and you can have your very own massive distributed experiment. Whose results will be published soon enough.

Advertisements

[IJHPSA] Resilience to Churn of a Peer-to-Peer Evolutionary Algorithm

In this paper we analyse the resilience of a Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) subject to the following dynamics: computing nodes acting as peers leave the system independently from each other causing a collective effect known as churn. Since the P2P EA has been designed to tackle large instances of computationally expensive problems, we will assess its behaviour under these conditions, by performing a scalability analysis in five different scenarios using the Massively Multimodal Deceptive Problem as a benchmark.In all cases, the P2P EA reaches the success criterion without a penalty on the runtime. We show that the key to the algorithm resilience is to ensure enough peers at the beginning of the experiment; even if some of them leave, those that remain contain enough information to guarantee a reliable convergence.


See ya in PPSN

Today is the last, final and defintive day for submitting papers to the PPSN (Parallel Problem Solving from Nature) conference, and I think we’ve beaten some record here, since our research group (the extended GeNeura, with visiting researchers, other partners in research groups, and so no) is submitting 10 papers. Taking into account the usual PPSN acceptance rate, we’ll probably only manage to get 3 accepted, so anything more than that will really be a success.
There are several evolutionary computation conferences out there, some of them good, some not as good, but for us PPSN is the absolute best. This would be the seudo-20th anniversary (actually, 10th edition, 18th anniversary), and for us it would be our personal 12th anniversary, since the first time we had something admitted in that conference was in 1996, and we haven’t failed a single one (even organized one of them). So even if this year we’re attending all EC conferences there are (CEC, GECCO -yes, GECCO-, Evostar), we really can’t miss this one.
So if you are submitting to PPSN (more than 220, for the time being), good luck, and see you there!