Paper “Testing the Differences of Using RGB and HSV Histograms During Evolution in Evolutionary Art” in ECTA

This week we are presenting the paper “Testing the Differences of Using RGB and HSV Histograms During Evolution in Evolutionary Art” in the Evolutionary Computation Theory and Applications.

This is the work we developed in the Hackathon of the Spanish Free Software Contest of the University of Granada with the help of several students of our university (who are also authors!).

In this work we have added Processing to our OSGiLiath (service oriented architecture for evolutionary algorithms) framework to generate images from individual representations to work with generative art. The fitness is the equality to a predefined image. HSV, RGB and a combination of both have been used.

The abstract:

This paper compares the use of RGB and HSV histograms during the execution of an Evolutionary Algorithm. This algorithm generates abstract images that try to match the histograms of a target image. Three different fitness functions have been used to compare: the differences between the individual with the RGB histogram of the test image, the HSV histogram, and an average of the two histograms at the same time. Results show that the HSV fitness also increases the similarities of the RGB (and therefore, the average) more than the other two measures.

And here is the poster:

ecta

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More results of the hispano-mexican collaboration

As a result of a collaboration with Mario García Valdez, Leonardo Trujillo and Francisco Fernández (this one from Spain) we have published two papers based on the EvoSpace framework a pool-based evolutionary architecture for interactive and straight evolutionary computation. The first paper describes the EvoSpace-i, the interactive part and is well described by Paco Fernández in our group blog, and the

From Emergence to Emergency (exit)

Despite the hotel’s firealarm, which forced us all to leave the room, out to the “pleasant” New Orleans’ weather, when I was on slide 12, I eventually finished the presentation of this paper in the 2011 Congress on Evolutionary Computation:

Fernandes, Isidoro, Barata, Merelo, Rosa, From Pherographia to Color Pherographia – Color Sketching with Artificial Ants

Abstract—Ant algorithms are known to return effective results in those problems that may be reduced to finding paths through a graph. However, this class of bio-inspired heuristics have raised the interest of the artistic community as well, namely of the artists that work on the blurred border between art and science. This paper describes an extension of an ant algorithm that, although has been designed as an edge detection tool and a model for collective perception, has also been used for creating artworks that were exhibited to a heterogeneous audience. The algorithm is a self-organized and stigmergic social insects’ model that is able to evolve lines along the contours of an image, in a decentralized and local manner. The result is the emergence of global patterns called pheromone maps. These maps – which were later named with the term pherographia – are grayscale sketches of the original black-and-white image on top of which the model evolves. This work goes beyond grayscale images and addresses colored pherographia, by proposing several image transformation and border selection methods based on behavioral variations of the basic algorithm.