A better TORCS driving controller presented in EvoStar 2018

Amazing bench
Last year, we presented along with Mohammed Salem, from the university of Mascara, in Algeria, our TORCS driving controller. This controller effectively drives a simulated vehicle, considering input from its sensors, and deciding on a target speed and how to turn the steering wheel.
Poster session, with our poster in the first position
This year, in Evostar 2018 in Parma, we had again our paper accepted for the poster session, which took place in the incredible corridor to the right of these words. The poster included interactive elements, such as a small car used for demonstration on how the driver worked.

And it works really well, or at least better than the previous versions. The key element was the design of a new fitness function that includes damages, and also terms related to speed. Still some way to go; in the near future we will be posting our new results in this area.

The book of proceedings can be downloaded from Springer. Our paper is in page 342 and you can also download just the paper from here, but we do open science, so you can follow our writing process and download the paper from this GitHub repository too

 

 

Advertisements

Early prediction of the outcome of Starcraft Games

As a result of Antonio Álvarez Caballero master’s thesis, we’ll be presenting tomorrow at the IJCCI 2017 conference a poster on the early prediction of Starcraft games.
The basic idea behind this line of research is to try and find a model of the game so that we can do fast fitness evaluation of strategies without playing the whole game, which can take up to 60 minutes. That way, we can optimize those strategies in an evolutionary algorithm and find the best ones.
In our usual open science style, paper and data are available in a repository.
Our conclusions say that we might be able to pull that off, using k-nearest neighbor algorithm. But we might have to investigate a bit further if we really want to find a model that gives us some insight about what makes a strategy a winner.

37404346594_a261c62e38_k.jpg

Dark clouds allow early prediction of heavy rain in Funchal, near where IJCCI is taking place

Master of Evolution! Using Genetic Algorithms to generate decks for the game HearthStone

This September we attended to the IEEE CIG 2017 Conference in Santorini, Greece, to present the paper “Evolutionary Deckbuilding in HearthStone”. This paper was written in collaboration with our colleagues Alberto Tonda and Giovanni Squillero.

The story of this paper started a (not so) long time ago while me and Alberto were discussing about how awesome HearthStone is. Suddenly, we thought about how easy it would be to create the constraints for the uGP framework, and that there were some open source simulators of the game. In a while, we already had the constraints, the simulator adapted to accept individuals from uGP, and some experiments running.

And we finished the paper after, of course.

You can download the paper draft from here (the electronic original version is not available yet).

And here is the presentation:

The abstract:

—One of the most notable features of collectible card games is deckbuilding, that is, defining a personalized deck before the real game. Deckbuilding is a challenge that involves a big and rugged search space, with different and unpredictable behaviour
after simple card changes and even hidden information. In this paper, we explore the possibility of automated deckbuilding: a genetic algorithm is applied to the task, with the evaluation delegated to a game simulator that tests every potential deck against a varied and representative range of human-made decks.
In these preliminary experiments, the approach has proven able to create quite effective decks, a promising result that proves that, even in this challenging environment, evolutionary algorithms can find good solutions.

How good are different languages at runnig evolutionary algorithms?

As part of the EvoStar conference, which took place last week, we presented the poster Benchmarking Languages for Evolutionary Algorithms, where, with help from many friends in Open Science fashion, we tested several a bunch of compiled and scripting languages on several common evolutionary operations: crossover, mutation and OneMax.

It was presented in poster form, and you had to be there to actually understand it. Since you are not, it’s better if you use this comments (or those at the poster) to inquire about it. Or you can check out the interactive presentation we also did, which in fact includes data and everything in the source.
This work is ongoing, and you are very welcome to participate. Just take a peek at the repo, and do a pull request.

Enviada la versión definitiva del trabajo “Predicción a muy corto plazo de series temporales de volumen de tráfico rodado mediante co-evolución de RNFBR”

Tras realizar las correspondientes modificaciones indicadas por los revisores del congreso MAEB 2015, hemos procedido a enviar la versión definitiva del trabajo, usando para ello la famosa plataforma EasyChair.
Cabe recordar que MAEB’2015 se celebrará en Mérida-Almendralejo, durante los días 4 al 6 de Febrero de 2015, y estará organizada por el Centro Universitario de Mérida, el cual pertenece a la Universidad de Extremadura.
Toda la info del congreso en: http://www.eweb.unex.es/eweb/maeb2015/

[Paper] My life as a sim: evolving unique and engaging life stories using virtual worlds

Our latest publication My life as a sim: evolving unique and engaging life stories using virtual worlds, using our framework MADE (created by @rubenhek), has been published in the ALIFE 2014 conference. The abstract:

Stories are not only painfully weaved by crafty writers in the solitude of their studios; they also have to be produced massively for non-player characters in the video game industry or tailored to particular tastes in personalized stories. However, the creation of fictional stories is a very complex task that usually implies a creative process where the author has to combine characters, conflicts and backstories to create an engaging narrative. This work describes a general methodology to generate cohesive and coherent backstories where desired archetypes (universally accepted literary symbols) can emerge in complex stochastic systems. This methodology supports the modeling and parametrization of the agents, the environment where they will live and the desired literary setting. The use of a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is proposed to establish the parameter configuration that will lead to backstories that best fit the setting. Information extracted from a simulation can then be used to create the literary work. To demonstrate the adequacy of the methodology, we perform an implementation using a specific multi-agent system and evaluate the results, testing with three different literary settings.

Check out the presentation by @jjmerelo at http://jj.github.io/alife14-made/#/home. You can download the proceedings of the conference (CC license), or download the paper draft.

More information is available on the project page.

Free access to paper accepted at GECCO’14

During 1 month, papers accepted at GECCO1’4 will be freely available. Thus, you can get and read our papers:

  • “Assessing different architectures for evolutionary algorithms in javascript” by Juan Julián Merelo, Pedro Castillo, Antonio Mora, Anna I. Esparcia-Alcázar, Víctor M. Rivas Santos (doi 10.1145/2598394.2598460) at http://goo.gl/jqLud5
  • NodEO, a multi-paradigm distributed evolutionary algorithm platform in JavaScript” by Juan-Julián Merelo, Pedro Castillo, Antonio Mora, Anna Esparcia-Alcázar, Víctor Rivas-Santos (doi:10.1145/2598394.2605688) at http://goo.gl/eFmv1T
  • “Enforcing corporate security policies via computational intelligence techniques” by Antonio M. Mora, Paloma De las Cuevas, Juan Julián Merelo, Sergio Zamarripa, Anna I. Esparcia-Alcázar (doi: 10.1145/2598394.2605438) at http://goo.gl/33gWES
  • A methodology for designing emergent literary backstories on non-player characters using genetic algorithms”, by Rubén Héctor García-Ortega, Pablo García-Sánchez, Antonio Miguel Mora, Juan Julián Merelo (doi: 10.1145/2598394.2598482) at http://goo.gl/9CEcMc

Enjoy!